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RezV Elite – a familiar scheme

May 26

RezV Elite is a supplement containing the acai berry and resveratrol, a substance found in red wine that is currently undergoing a wide variety of studies. Some of these studies find that mice subjected to resveratrol live longer, other studies show signs of resveratrol preventing prostate cancer. But I’m here to write about this particular RezV Elite product, not resveratrol in general. Learn more about resveratrol and acai berries here.

Upon visiting RezV Elite’s website I instantly noticed some familiar design styles that I’ve noticed on other acai berry scam websites which I’ve written about in the past. Identical color schemes, and even some of the same buttons. They all use similar claims, they promote a free trial where you only pay for shipping. What they don’t advertise very clearly is the fact that if you don’t cancel within 14 days, you will be charged a more significant amount for that trial bottle + every month thereafter. In ResV Elite’s case, that amount is $79.95. Of course, you have to look through their terms and conditions, found through a small link at the bottom of their website to learn the true cost.

Now, I have no issue with free trial offers, however, I have received numerous emails through this website from people who have tried similar free trial offers, and when they attempt to cancel, no one picks up the phone on the other end. I’m not saying RezV Elite is the same as these other companies, but judging by the look of the website and the structure of the offer, it’s just so similar I would expect it’s run by the same group or company.

If you followed the previous link, you will see that there’s no shortage of these types of scams out there. In fact, they pop up so quickly I simply can’t keep up. I’ve received complaints about Dr. Acai Skin Care where the trial never even showed up, but the credit card was billed. I’ve received complaints about Acai Alive, Vital Acai…the list goes on. The problem is a lot of people are earning an income from promoting these types of products. Feel free to peruse this article about how affiliate marketers are benefiting from promoting these scams.

All in all, be careful, read the fine print, and the old cliche lives on – if it sounds to good to be true, it probably is.

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MonaVie, the official juice of the Boston Red Sox

May 03

MonaVie is nothing new to the world of professional athletics. The NBA cleared MonaVie for use by NBA players, declaring it free of all banned substances. And now, for the second year in a row, the Boston Red Sox have declared MonaVie as their official juice. Of course, MonaVie is excited about the partnership – Dallin Larsen, Founder and President of MonaVie says:

“We are thrilled to be associated with the Boston Red Sox, it is no coincidence that we are partnering with a team that clearly demonstrates a dedication to achievement and a winning attitude.”

Even though MonaVie products are distributed through a multi-level marketing type of setup, it continues to gain momentum. Partnerships like this are perfect for the company – not only does it demonstrate the quality of the products, but it also helps maintain the corporate image of MonaVie since it’s always overshadowed by it’s MLM approach.

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Mr. Food talks about the acai berry

Apr 19

Mr Food features an assortment of acai berry juices in this video, including Purple, Bossa Nova, V8 V-Fusion, Dom Dai, MonaVie and even a Haagen Daaz sorbet. He does mention the fact that a number claim to experience health benefits associated with drinking acai berry products, but rightfully states that it shouldn’t be relied on as a medicine. Instead, work it into a healthy diet and an active lifestyle.

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Acai bery scams from a new perspective

Mar 30

I have received a number of Emails from visitors to acairesource.com that clicked on Google Ads that brought them to a website promoting acai berry weight loss products. Many of these programs offer a trial at a very cheap price, often just charging for shipping for the first bottle. However, after the trial period ends, if you don’t get in touch with the company, they will start billing your credit card automatically. The problem I have with these sites is that they bury the information about automatic credit card charges deep within the site and, more often than not, don’t answer their phones or emails. I’ve seen automatic charges range from $40 to $90, and there seems to be hundreds of websites promoting similar products with similar payment schemes. I’ve looked into blocking these types of sites from acairesource.com Google Ads, but there seems to be new sites every day.

Now, it sounds as if the FTC is cracking down on a number of these websites, which has sparked some controversy. From my perspective, I don’t support these “scams”. These sites often use celebrity figures, Oprah is common, and use false testimonials about the performance of the acai berry supplement. Any company that hides the true cost of their product and makes false claims about their product I consider a scam, simple as that. BUT, there are a number of Internet marketers making a killing from selling these products, and they’re screaming “accountability falls on the consumer”.

There’s a great conversation going on over at Shoemoney’s Blog talking about whether the FTC should be stepping in or whether it’s up to the consumer to make a smart decision. Keep in mind, Shoemoney is an affliate marketer himself, and many members of his audience are as well. Shoemoney’s thoughts lean towards placing the accoutability with the consumer, stating:

DO YOU REALLY THINK YOU CAN LOOSE 50 LBS IN A MONTH FROM DRINKING BERRY JUICE AND WASHING OUT YOUR COLON YOU FRICKIN RETARD.

Now I respect Shoemoney and follow his blog fairly closely. He’s good at what he does and has helped countless affiliate marketers make a better living. But I disagree with him on this point. If you can’t reach a company to cancel your acai berry trial by the methods provided on their website, you simply can’t hold the consumer accountable. None the less, every acai berry scam website that has been reporting to me has, somewhere, reported their true monthly costs and that the customer will be billed automatically after a certain period of time. This information doesn’t always exist where you might expect. Sometimes it’s in the terms of service, sometimes it’s in FAQ sections. In fact, one time I saw it in a FAQ page under “What do I do if I want to continue the trial?” – since the acai berry has no scientific proof of helping with weight loss, obviously the majority of consumer’s aren’t going to want to continue their trial, and won’t click on such a link. However, this was the only place on the entire website that advertised the true cost.

Again, there’s no shortage of acai berry scams, and covering each and every one of them would become a full time job. I’ve written about a few acai berry scams here, but make sure you dig deep when making online purchases.

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Benefits of the acai berry on Fox News

Mar 22

Here’s a quick video from Fox News about the benefits of the acai berry. It touches on the study using the acai berry to fight off leukemia cells in a lab, as well as the fact that some of the acai berry products can be on the expensive side. There’s a variety of acai products, so keep in mind the price quoted here near the end of the video isn’t necessarily the best deal out there.

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